Burst Toothbrush

The Burst toothbrush is the rare product clogging up the promoted posts and stories of your Instagram feed that is actually good. The rechargeable brush, which the company has spared no expense to inform you is sponsored by CHRISSY TEIGEN, has a tapered handle that’s very comfortable to hold. Like those from the Sonicare ads of old, the Burst’s bristles vibrate back and forth, supposedly tens of thousands of times per minute. Luckily, this doesn’t mean the Burst feels like it’s attacking your teeth—the brush has a really gentle action that was pleasant to wake up to in the mornings. And because the bristles aren’t that long and the brush head isn’t that thick, the brush head fit in my mouth comfortably. I could use it without spraying spit and toothpaste all over my bathroom mirror.

Once the brush’s two-minute timer has elapsed and it turns itself off, you can just leave the Burst on your counter or in your medicine cabinet. The battery life should last for a few weeks of normal use between chargers. When you’re ready to charge it, you just set the toothbrush in its stand and plug the stand’s USB cord into the wall with the included adapter. I suppose you could also plug it into your computer, assuming it still has USB-A ports. I have trouble finding legitimate issue with this. You’ll certainly turn heads in your coworking space.

The Burst is a bit pricier than some of the other subscription-based toothbrushes we considered. A white or black brush will cost you $70 and the subscription for new brush heads costs $6 every 90 days. If you want the brush in rose gold, you’ll pay $100 for the brush and $7 for the subscription to new brush heads. One more reason to get the subscription, it gives you access to a lifetime warranty on your brush. But if you don’t subscribe you still get two years.

 

One thing about the Burst does give us slight pause: it’s “charcoal infused” bristles. Burst and many companies that make charcoal infused toothpaste claim that charcoal gives the toothbrush additional whitening capabilities. As dentists quoted in a report in Scienceline pointed out “there’s simply not enough evidence to back the promises made for using charcoal for oral hygiene.” This isn’t because all dentists are convinced brushing with charcoal is bad, it’s rather that there hasn’t been enough research done into the topic. The few studies conducted mostly conclude that more studies need to be done. For now, the Burst’s advantages outweigh any of our minor concerns about charcoal, particularly since we’ve been using charcoal grooming products with no issue for the last few years.

The bottom Line

Burst‘s replacement brush heads, which come from Burst quarterly for only $6 per head (remember, the brush itself comes with one already), alleviate you of the arduous task of keeping your oral hygiene equipment up to snuff on your own. No, that may not sound like much, but it is one less thing to worry about, which I’ll always take.

From here on out, I no longer have to concern myself with keeping a schedule around both buying and remembering to change my brush head every three months. That may not sound like much of a relief, but don’t lie: Are you really making sure that you change your current toothbrush or brush head every three months? Sign up for Burst. Your teeth will thank you.

Get yourself a BURST Toothbrush.

User Reviews

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